Current Course Offerings

May

G St 350 –  Gender and Sexuality in Cinema
Instructor: T. Starkey
M-F, 1-4:30
Lamar 404

This course is an examination of 1970s American revisionist cinema, critically analyzing films by such directors as Martin Scorsese, John Carpenter and Terrence Malick, who reimagined traditional Hollywood genres like the woman’s picture, horror movie, and outlaw film. These maverick filmmakers often challenge and interrogate dominant ideological narratives, especially concerning gender that circulate in American culture.

The social, political and cultural forces unleashed in the 1960s and 1970s (for example, the Vietnam War, the Civil Rights and Women’s movements, and Watergate), influenced moviemakers and impacted the American psyche. The social and cultural conservatism of the 1950s, with its revival of the cult of domesticity and insular vision of womanhood, was radically undermined by filmmakers.

Philip Kaufman’s revisionist version of a science fiction classic Invasion of the Body Snatchers and Malick’s Badlands are just a few examples of the films that presented audiences with complicated characters that subverted static notions of identity often linked by Hollywood to representations of race, class or gender.

 

First Summer

G St 201 – Introduction to Gender Studies
Instructor: E. Venell
Web

This course explores some of the foundational texts, figures, and themes in the interdisciplinary field of gender studies. Topics to be addressed include theories of gender, race, class, sexuality and other aspects of identity; histories and critiques of different lines of feminist thought; analyses of popular culture and the role of representation in shaping gender; feminist activism in the past and present; LGBTQ history and activism; intersectionality; reproductive justice; transgender studies and trans liberation. The course emphasizes critical thinking and the cultivation of research skills necessary to investigate social and biological binaries.

G ST 301 – Gender and Sexuality on the Internet
Instructor: K. Cozart
Web

In this course, students will examine how women and sexual/gender minorities have used the Internet to create virtual spaces online, discuss the harassment they face in digital environments, and lastly explore how they have used the Internet to organize and advocate for their issues.

 

Second Summer

G St 201 – Introduction to Gender Studies
Instructor: TBD
Web

Exploration of the growing body of research available from many disciplines (humanities, social sciences, sciences) for the study of women and men in the United States and abroad. Investigation of femininity and masculinity and the intersection of gender with other categories of identity.

 

G ST 301 – Women, Bodies, and Horror
Instructor: E. Venell
Web

A study of gender within traditional and popular culture. This incarnation of Topics in Gender and Culture focuses on theories, representations, and metaphors of the body. Course texts include visual representations and written accounts of gender, race, disability, illness, pregnancy, and class, with an emphasis on gender in horror films from The Brood to Get Out.

Fall

G St 201 – Sec 1 (Honors) – Introduction to Gender Studies
Instructor: T. Starkey
TTH, 1-2:15
Honors 016

This is an interdisciplinary course that examines the construction of gender and identity. Major focal points for discussion and analysis include race, class, gender, ethnicity, and sexuality, especially the ways that these issues often overlap, influencing personal and collective experiences.

 The history of the women’s movements, feminism, the body in popular culture, and the formation of social hierarchies will be points of discussion, and represent some of the key theoretical issues examined by scholars in the field of Womens and Gender Studies.

G St 201 – Sec 2 – Introduction to Gender Studies
Instructor: TBD
TTH, 8-9:15
Lamar 214

Exploration of the growing body of research available from many disciplines (humanities, social sciences, sciences) for the study of women and men in the United States and abroad. Investigation of femininity and masculinity and the intersection of gender with other categories of identity.

 

G St 201 – Web 1 – Introduction to Gender Studies
Instructor: T. Starkey
Web

This is an interdisciplinary course that examines the construction of gender and identity. Major focal points for discussion and analysis include race, class, gender, ethnicity, and sexuality, especially the ways that these issues often overlap, influencing personal and collective experiences.

 The history of the women’s movements, feminism, the body in popular culture, and the formation of social hierarchies will be points of discussion, and represent some of the key theoretical issues examined by scholars in the field of Womens and Gender Studies.

 

G St 201 – Web 2 – Introduction to Gender Studies
G St 201 – Web 3 – Introduction to Gender Studies
G St 201 – Web 4 – Introduction to Gender Studies
Instructor: E. Venell
Web

This course explores some of the foundational texts, figures, and themes in the interdisciplinary field of gender studies. Topics to be addressed include theories of gender, race, class, sexuality and other aspects of identity; histories and critiques of different lines of feminist thought; analyses of popular culture and the role of representation in shaping gender; feminist activism in the past and present; LGBTQ history and activism; intersectionality; reproductive justice; transgender studies and trans liberation. The course emphasizes critical thinking and the cultivation of research skills necessary to investigate social and biological binaries.

G St 201 – Web 5 – Introduction to Gender Studies
Instructor: TBD
Web

Exploration of the growing body of research available from many disciplines (humanities, social sciences, sciences) for the study of women and men in the United States and abroad. Investigation of femininity and masculinity and the intersection of gender with other categories of identity.

G St 202 – Web 1 – Introduction to Queer Studies
Instructor: J. Enszer
Web

This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of queer and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) studies with a particular focus on the queer south. This course examines the historical and social contexts of personal, cultural and political aspects of queer/LGBT life, and it explores LGBT liberation movements in relation to families, religion, laws, and society using intersectional lenses that consider gender, ethnicity, race, class, and ability. We consider the status, roles, and experiences, of lesbians, gay men, bisexual, and transgender people, using a variety of sources from fields such as anthropology, history, literature, sociology, southern studies, and women’s studies. Through the readings, discussions, and assignments, students develop critical analytical skills to consider social change movements with particular attention to how sex, gender, race, class, sexuality, sexual orientation, and other systems of power shape people’s everyday lives.

 

G St 202 – Web 2 – Introduction to Queer Studies
Instructor: J. Hovey
Web

Why do people define themselves as “straight” or “gay” or “lesbian” or “queer”? This course will look at some of the central texts of queer theory in order to contextualize and historicize the notion of homosexuality as a primary category of identity. Because the relationship of gender and sexuality to the body has become so important in recent years, we will look at theories of perversity, consider the relationship of gender to sexuality, and studying the debates around the politics of transgender identity. Finally, we will discuss issues of normativity as they relate to gay and lesbian assimilation. In other words, what does it mean to be “queer,” and how is it different from being “normal”? Texts will include Michel Foucault, A History of Sexuality, Part I; Kate Bornstein, Gender Outlaw; Riki Wilchins, Queer Theory/Gender Theory, An Instant Primer; Black Queer Studies, eds. E. Patrick Johnson and Mae G. Henderson; George Chauncey, Why Marriage?

 

G St 301 – Web 1 – Women, Bodies, and Horror
Instructor: E. Venell
Web

A study of gender within traditional and popular culture. This incarnation of Topics in Gender and Culture focuses on theories, representations, and metaphors of the body. Course texts include visual representations and written accounts of gender, race, disability, illness, pregnancy, and class, with an emphasis on gender in horror films from The Brood to Get Out.

 

G St 301 – Web 2 – Fantasies of Immersion: Spectacle and Gender in U.S. visual culture
Instructor: L. Delassus
Web

This course examines representations of femininity, masculinity and sexuality in popular American visual culture, with specific attention to cultural phenomena that fall into the category of “immersive spectacle.” Traversing a diverse range of media forms that span the late-19th, 20th, and early-21st centuries, immersive spectacles are interactive visual displays that simulate environments, processes, and events similar to—but also other than—our own. In this course, we will use approaches from media and film studies, gender and sexuality studies, cultural studies and literary theory to analyze how immersive spectacles such as panoramas, stereoscopy, museum dioramas, amusement and theme parks, 3D film, widescreen formats such as IMAX, Hollywood blockbusters and videogames construct gendered viewing positions that intersect categories of race, ethnicity, nation and class.

 

G St 301 – Web 3 – Women and Poverty
Instructor: N. Provolt
Web

 

G St 303 – Sec 1 – The Family
Instructor: E. Lake
MW, 4-5:15
Lamar 129

G St 303 – Web 1 – The Family
Instructor: J. Hill
Web

G St 303 – Web 2 – The Family
Instructor: J. Hill
Web

The American family as an institution and a group of interacting persons; the nature and problems of courtship, husband-wife, and parent-child relationships.

 

G St 329 – Sec 1 – Queer Playwriting and American Culture
Instructor: J. Cantu
MW, 2:30 – 3:45
Hume 215
Crosslisted as THEA 329

An exploration of LGBTQ-related plays and their influence on American culture.  The course examines how LGBTQ-related plays contributed to shaping American cultural trends and values and traces the evolution of popular opinion.  A significant portion of the course of study is devoted to the perspectives of LGBTQ characters, individuals, and playwrights.

 

G St 333 – Sec 1 – Trans Theory
Instructor: J. Hovey
Web

Who are trans people? How is trans different from lesbian, gay, or queer? What is the relationship between sex and gender? Sexuality and gender? What is trans politics? This course will look at some theories of trans embodiment, trans cultural construction, and trans expression that consider both the history and evolution of trans and the way transgender expression has both extended the project of “queering” normativity through queer theory and queer expression, and turned that project upside down and inside out. How is it possible to insist that gender is fluid, yet crucial? How do you emphasize the importance of gender, yet also work to undo the importance of gender? Texts will include Julia Serano, Whipping Girl; David Valentine, Imagining Transgender: An Ethnography of a Category; Judith Butler Undoing Gender; C. Riley Snorton Black on Both Sides: A Racial History of Trans Identity; and The Transgender Studies Reader.

 

G St 344 – Sec 1 – Women and Politics
Instructor: S. Allen
TTH, 8:0 – 9:15
Bryant 111
Crosslisted as POL 346

The purpose of this course is to examine the agency of women in shaping world politics, and the influence of international relations on the lives of women around the world. In the first half we will focus on women’s representation and elected leadership. We will look in-depth at the reasons why women have historically been excluded from politics, as well as the structural challenges and institutional changes that have been made to increase women’s representation. We will then move beyond elected office to consider women’s participation in politics through social movements. We will examine how international norms regarding gender equality have been enshrined in the operations of international organizations and what effects these norms have had on women’s rights and political participation in various contexts.

 

G ST 350 – Sec 1 – Gender and Sexuality in Cinema
Instructor: T. Starkey
T, 4-6:30
Lamar 519

This course is an examination of 1970s American revisionist cinema, critically analyzing films by such directors as Martin Scorsese, John Carpenter and Terrence Malick, who reimagined traditional Hollywood genres like the woman’s picture, horror movie, and outlaw film. These maverick filmmakers often challenge and interrogate dominant ideological narratives, especially concerning gender that circulate in American culture.

The social, political and cultural forces unleashed in the 1960s and 1970s (for example, the Vietnam War, the Civil Rights and Women’s movements, and Watergate), influenced moviemakers and impacted the American psyche. The social and cultural conservatism of the 1950s, with its revival of the cult of domesticity and insular vision of womanhood, was radically undermined by filmmakers.

Philip Kaufman’s revisionist version of a science fiction classic Invasion of the Body Snatchers and Malick’s Badlands are just a few examples of the films that presented audiences with complicated characters that subverted static notions of identity often linked by Hollywood to representations of race, class or gender.

 

G ST 350 – Web 1 – Gender and Sexuality in Cinema
Instructor: L. Delassus
Web

This course examines representations of femininity, masculinity, and sexuality across different modes of film practice in the history of popular US cinema, with specific attention to how these representations intersect with race, ethnicity, nation and class. Using analytical approaches from gender and sexuality studies, film and media studies, and cultural studies we will investigate the ways in which popular US cinema critically engages in the historical, social, and cultural construction of gender and sexuality. This course teaches basic concepts of film analysis so that students can apply them to the films we watch, which will include: Alien (Ridley Scott, 1979); All that Heaven Allows (Douglas Sirk, 1959); American Beauty (Sam Mendes, 1999); Baby Face (Alfred E. Green, 1933); Far from Heaven (Todd Haynes, 2002); A Florida Enchantment (Sidney Drew, 1914); Get Out (Jordan Peele, 2017); Hollywood Shuffle (Robert Townsend, 1987); Lip (Tracey Moffatt, 1999); Mad Max: Fury Road (George Miller, 2015); Stepford Wives (Bryan Forbes, 1975); Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock, 1958).

 

G ST 353 – Web 1 – Gender and Sexuality in the Media
Instructor: K. Cozart
Web

This course teaches students to examine and analyze how representations of gender and sexuality have or have not changed over time. This exploration will include theoretical readings and analysis of television, film, music & music videos, broadcast and print journalism, magazines, advertising, social media, comic books, graphic novels, anime, user-generated online content, and online gaming.

 

G ST 357 – Sec 1 – Women in the South
Instructor: J. Hall
TTH, 9:30-10:45
Bishop 104Crosslisted as ENG 357

G ST 357 – Sec 2 – Women in the South
Instructor: J. Hall
TTH, 11:00-12:15
Bishop 104
Crosslisted as ENG 357

This course provides a survey of literary representations of southern women from the antebellum era to the present. Genres include fiction, non-fiction, and poetry by Harriet Jacobs, Zora Neale Hurston, Eudora Welty, Natasha Trethewey, and several others.

 

G ST 363 – Sec 1 – Gender in Latin America
Instructor: K. Centellas
TTH, 2:30-3:45
Croft 107
Crosslisted as INST 363

Historical and ethnographic examination of gender in Latin America, with an emphasis on kinship, family structure, and identity.

 

G ST 384 – Sec 1 – Studies in Gay & Lesbian Literature and Theory
Instructor: J. Harker
TTH, 1:00-2:15
Lamar 404
Crosslisted as ENG 384

This course focuses on feminist, trans, and queer explorations of gender from the 1970s to the present.  The writers we will read sought to queer gender—to imagine identities outside the gender binary. Their creative reimaginations of gender transform bodies, language, and identities. We will read books by June Arnold, Armistead Maupin, Leslie Feinberg, Ali Smith, and Jane Eaton Hamilton. Students will write five short papers and a final research paper.

 

G ST 385 – Web 1 – Women in Literature
Instructor: M. Hipp
Web
Crosslisted as ENG 385

This course will focus on poetry, memoir, and fiction by 20th and 21st century women writers from the U.S., Europe, and the Caribbean. The course is divided into four modules, Silence & Voice, Writing Bodies/Bodies Writing, Identity & Difference, and Resistance & Transformation, which will help us conceptualize key questions about women’s writing. Under what historical circumstances and constraints have women written? How have they managed to break silence and find their voices? What strategies have they used to convey their ideas? What perspectives on women’s bodies do women offer when writing about sexual desire, motherhood, or sexual assault? How have women writers resisted and how do they continue to resist the political, literary, or social status quo? By the end of the course, students should be able to address each of these questions. Among the authors we will read are bell hooks, Audre Lorde, Angela Carter, Helene Cixous, Claudia Rankine, and Adrienne Rich. Assignments include weekly blog posts, exams, and a research paper.

 

G ST 385 – Sec 1 – Women in Literature
Instructor: E. Drew
TTH, 2:30-3:45
Hume 111
Crosslisted as ENG 385

Speculative fiction, it is often pointed out, was born with the Creature in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein in 1818. Even before that, Margaret Cavendish’s The Blazing World invented an entire world built on the premises of the scientific theories and desire for personal sovereignty that her patriarchal society dismissed and denigrated. This course will explore the worlds women have invented and explored through science fiction and fantasy novels and film from the seventeenth century to today. We will examine the ways these worlds interrogate, respond to, and even predict the political, social, and scientific problems of the societies from which they emerged. Authors include Mary Shelley, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Madeleine L’Engle, Octavia Butler, Ursuala K. LeGuin, Margaret Atwood, Louise Erdrich, Nnedi Okorafor, and N.K. Jemisin.

 

G ST 390 – Web 1 – Feminist Philosophy
Instructor: B. Smyth
Hybrid – M, 1-1:50
TBA
Crosslisted as PHIL 390

Philosophy is conceptually fundamental to theoretical and scientific discourse. Yet traditionally it exhibits profound forms of gender bias. In recent decades, feminist philosophers have sought to remedy this situation, and we will consider some of the main themes of this work: oppression and intersectionality, embodied experience, objectivity in knowledge, ethics and autonomy, and the prospects for feminist politics. Overall, the course will provide a substantial introduction to feminist philosophy that will complement students’ work in gender studies, and provide opportunities to reflect in new ways on their own experience.

 

G St 399 – Podcasting: Power of Storytelling in a Digital World
Instructor: A. Steele
MW, 5-6:15
Farley 138 Writing Lab

This class is offered to students interested in producing oral history podcasts as it relates to gender studies and women’s rights in Mississippi during the early 20th century. The primary objective is to produce engaging and storytelling audio projects that are of professional quality. Students will also learn basic mobile photography skills to produce formal portraits of their interviewees. Students will learn how interviewing, scriptwriting, and producing skills. Work produced in this class will directly benefit journalism and gender studies majors and minors, who are interested in multimedia, and community engagement through cultural and historic preservation. Each student will be required to pitch and produce at least three individual stories that include news and feature stories, with reports of varying time lengths. The goal is create thoughtful, newsworthy and engaging audio projects and an accompanying photo exhibition for university-sponsored events.

 

G St 414 – Race, Place, and Space
Instructor: B. Foster
TTH, 1-2:15
Lamar 555
Crosslisted as Soc 414 and AAS 414

Maps are instructive. Some tell us where to go. Others tell us where we’ve been. They can reveal closed and detoured routes. They can show if we are ahead of schedule and alert us when we are behind. This class is about maps—in particular, the racial maps of the contemporary United States of America. Here, we are using “map” both as a metaphor for how racial inequality manifests in geographically-distinct ways and as a framework for understanding how racism structures American culture, politics, social institutions, and everyday life. We will focus special attention on black maps, surveying classical and contemporary scholarship to debunk dominant fictions and reveal uncomfortable truths about the experiences and everyday realities of black folks. As with most trips, this course begins with good music. The first section draws on the mixtape metaphor to explore foundational concepts and theories in the study of racism and racial inequality. Then, we “map” the nation’s contemporary racial landscape, beginning in the Lawndale community in Chicago and ending in the Beautiful, Dark, Twisted imagination of Kanye West. Along the way, we’ll talk Kendrick, J. Cole, Big Freedia, and A Seat at the Table. We’ll read Bonilla-Silva and Zandria Robinson. We’ll debate reparations and explore the school-to-prison pipeline. We’ll hear from James Baldwin. Importantly, we’ll also hear from each other, treating our own selfhood as a type of racial map, with lessons, questions, and new routes to bear.

G St 418 – African American Women’s History
Instructor: S. Garrett-Scott
TTH, 9:30-10:45
Peabody 202
Crosslisted as HIST 418 and AAS 362

In this course, we will emphasize African American women’s activism within the Black Radical Tradition from African origins to the present. The course will acquaint you with many of the critical questions and concepts Africana women activists and scholars have developed as tools for thinking about the social construction of gender and race and how these categories of identity intersect with other relations of power. Consequently, we will explore the very different kinds of ideologies, strategies, practices, and discourses African American women have developed and mobilized over time and across lines of class, region, and sexual orientation. Our goal is to not only underscore the heterogeneity of African American women’s political imaginings and doings but also underscore a coherent but diverse, intersectional organizing tradition.

We will critically explore these and other questions: Is there a broad but distinct African American women’s organizing tradition, and what are its defining features or hallmarks? How have identities of gender, race, class, nationality, sexuality, religion, and age structured and shaped African American women’s activism? How do African American women reinforce and disrupt standard narratives about the Black Liberation Movement as well as the Women’s Rights movement? How have African American women carved out spaces within and in opposition to U.S. capitalism? How have other groups sought to represent and control African American women’s lives and bodies, and how have women themselves worked to represent themselves?

 

G St 425 – Religion, Gender, and Sexuality
Instructor: A. McDowell
TTH 11-12:15
Lamar 518
Crosslisted as SOC 425

This course considers how religion is used to shape, maintain, and transform gender and sexuality in U.S. society. We will pay close attention to a new and growing body of sociological research that uses qualitative case studies to examine the intersection of religion, gender, and sexuality from a feminist/queer theoretical perspective. This research tackles questions like: What makes women and men different? How do religious beliefs and practices structure gender relations? How do LGBT people understand and interact with religious teachings about natural sex differences?  In addition to reading and discussing recent studies in the subfield of religion, gender, and sexuality, students will learn about sociological research methods and learn to think critically about how our identities shape what we find intellectually relevant and empirically puzzling.

 

G St 454 – Women in Southern History
Instructor: J. Wilkerson
TTH, 2:30-3:45
Bishop 324
Crosslisted as HIST 454

This course explores the history of women and gender in the American South from 1800 to the present. We will consider major questions that relate to women and women’s place in society: How did different groups define womanhood? How did men’s and women’s relationships and roles change over time? How did major historical events affect women’s lives and their status in society? In what ways have women participated in politics, breaking down some barriers while helping to construct others? We will pay particular attention to how class, race, and place shaped the above issues, and the ways in which women molded politics, society, and culture in the American South. Themes we will examine closely include legal status, family life, political participation, reproduction, work, sexuality, and activism. Students will gain an understanding of the major issues and debates in the field of women’s history and will read, analyze, and develop arguments about how gender shaped the American South.

 

G St 491 – Special Topics in Gender and Literature
Instructor: A. Fischer-Wirth
TTH, 1-2:15
Anderson 231
Crosslisted as ENG 491

This semester, “Special Topics in Gender and Literature” will focus on environmental nonfiction, fiction, and poetry written by 20th– and 21st-century American women. Writers may include nonfiction writers Mary Daly, Donna Haraway, Terry Tempest Williams, Mary Austin; novelists Willa Cather, Olivia Butler, Barbara Kingsolver; poets Muriel Rukeyser, Elizabeth Bishop, Lucille Clifton, Linda Hogan, Layli Long Soldier, Rose McLarney, Laura-Gray Street, Alison Hedge Coke, Judy Jordan, Emmy Pérez, Tiffany Higgins, and/or others. We will look at a wide range of voices and concerns that span the last 120 years, and the country. The class will emphasize discussion as well as lecture, a research project of current urgency, and a range of other activities.

 

G St 497 – Internship in Gender Studies
Coordinator: J. Harker

G St 498 – Sec 1 – Special Topics in Gender Studies
Instructor: R. Justice-Malloy
MWF, 1-1:50
Hume 106
Crosslisted as THEA 498

G St 498 – Sec 2 – Special Topics in Gender Studies
Instructor: P. Wood
TTH, 2:30-3
:45
TBA
Crosslisted as THEA 498

Graduate Courses

G St 601 – Gender Theory
Instructor: C. Smith
T, 3-5:30
Lewis 109

In this class, we will examine a variety of theoretical perspectives and themes used by researchers of gender from the last century (e.g., Intersectionality, Queer Theory, Critical Race Theory).  Because there is not one theory but many, I will not be teaching you which is right or which is wrong; there is no such thing. In this class, you will need to think critically about the theories and understand how they are similar to and different from one another.  It will be up to you to evaluate the theories – Does the theory make logical sense? Is it consistent with material learned in other classes? Do research and personal experience support it? What kind of impact has it had on the field and beyond? You are expected to develop your own opinions about each of these theories, which you will then be able to explain, defend, and explore further.  

 

HST 614 The History of Sexuality in the Modern U.S.
Instructor: E. Payne
W, 4-6:30
Bishop 333

This graduate seminar will explore sexual categories, concepts, rules, laws, identities, and behaviors over several centuries of U.S. history. We will examine how women and men have been understood as sexual beings and how the study of sexuality illuminates broader social relations and structures. While human sexuality is often posited as “natural” and unchanging, discourses offered by religious, medical, scientific, and state authorities — as well as popular beliefs and practices of sex — have varied considerably over time. We will explore these changing conceptions of sexuality and investigate how they differed according to class, gender, race, geographic location, and age. At the same time, the course will also survey the shifting ways that scholars have conceived of sexuality as a subject of historical inquiry.

SOC 625 – Current Debates in Gender
Instructor: K. Dellinger
M, 1-3:30
Lamar 518

This course offers an overview and analysis of empirical research and theory on gender identity and gender inequality in the U.S.   We begin by discussing what gender is and how it has been studied by sociologists and feminist theorists. We then move to empirical case studies to examine current gender dynamics in a variety of institutions and social locations.  Each case study is paired with one of five well-established theoretical perspectives to offer the opportunity to explore how structural, symbolic interactionist, multiracial feminist approaches, masculinity studies, and transnational feminist thought contribute to the current sociological understanding of gender.

 

Others to be announced.