Cabbagetown: a Retrospective on Space and Place - Thursday, March 19th - Powerhouse

cabbagetownThe Southern Foodways Alliance and Sarah Isom Center are partnering to host “Cabbagetown: a Retrospective on Space and Place” at the Powerhouse on Thursday, March 19th. This event is free and open to the public.

In Atlanta, beginning in the latter half of the nineteenth-century, Cabbagetown was a working-class enclave centered around the textile industry. Its inhabitants were largely Appalachian migrants employed by the Fulton Bag and Cotton Mill. In 1978 the Mill closed, but many descendants of the original workers still called the neighborhood home as property in the area would go up for sale to the rest of the city.

By the early 1990s, the neighborhood had become an important hub for struggling artists and musicians. Atlanta bands such as Smoke, Opal Foxx Quartet, the Rock*A*Teens, and singers like Cat Power’s Chan Marshall and Kelly Hogan were participants who actively helped shape the city’s alternative music scene.

The neighborhood’s long historical narrative exposes how social, economic and cultural forces produce demographic change. In a space like Cabbagetown, one disenfranchised group can replace another. Dislocation and invisibility are often the byproducts of the process of gentrification. With each neighborhood transformation, complex issues of class, gender, sexuality, race, and foodways intersect to produce the shifting face(s) of place.

The evening line-up includes a photography exhibit by Oraien Catledge (a native Mississippian who started to visually document the Cabbagetown neighborhood and its people in the late 1970s into the early 1990s), a themed food tasting, and a screening of the documentary Benjamin Smoke (2000), which is an intimate exploration of the band Smoke and its members. Smoke member Bill Taft will appear live to perform his music. Poet Caroline Young, a longtime member of the community, will read. Food scholar Edward H. Davis will discuss foodways and place, including the humble ingredient that gave Cabbagetown its name.

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The Isom Center's Women in the Film Industry Series Presents: Joey Lauren Adams' "Come Early Morning"

comeearlymorning

 

The Sarah Isom Center for Women and Gender Studies at The University of Mississippi and Oxford’s Powerhouse Community Arts Center are proud to present a screening of actor-writer-director and former Oxonian Joey Lauren Adams’s film Come Early Morning (2006). Adams will introduce the film and participate in a Q&A session with the audience. This program is part of the Sarah Isom Center’s series Women in the Film Industry.

The screening is free and open to the public. Tickets for the post-show reception with Adams are ten dollars. Ticket price includes food by the Main Event and a cocktail. Tickets for the reception will be available at the door.

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Provocateur and National Treasure John Waters to Visit

John Waters dropping off 16mm prints of his early works at the Film Society. Photo by Eugene Hernandez. (Borrowed from http://www.filmlinc.com/

To experience a John Waters movie is to experience the carnivalesque. No other filmmaker can make his audience laugh till their eyes water, cringe in their seats, and potentially throw up -- all in the same moment. To watch one of his films is to experience a delicious delirium that makes you realize that he has turned your world and expectations topsy-turvy.

Dennis Lim, the Film Society's Director of Programming at the Lincoln Center, says it best when he observes that John Waters is "a lifelong provocateur and by now a national treasure. John Waters is a singular, even prophetic figure within not only American cinema but also the broader landscape of American popular culture. From his early underground sensations to his subversive work within the mainstream, no filmmaker has done as much to blur and challenge the distinctions between high and low culture, and between good and bad taste.”

We are excited to welcome John Waters to our campus. This student-inspired event was made possible by generous support from the University Lecture Series, numerous university entities, and private donations.

Tickets will be free and available from the UM Box Office by mid February.

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