Current Course Offerings

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Full Summer 2019

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Introduction to Gender Studies

Exploration of the growing body of research available from many disciplines (humanities, social sciences, sciences) for the study of women and men in the United States and abroad. Investigation of femininity and masculinity and the intersection of gender with other categories of identity.

Web 1
Instructor: K. Cozart

 

First Summer 2019

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Introduction to Gender Studies

This course explores some of the foundational texts, figures, and themes in the interdisciplinary field of gender studies. Topics to be addressed include theories of gender, race, class, sexuality and other aspects of identity; histories and critiques of different lines of feminist thought; analyses of popular culture and the role of representation in shaping gender; feminist activism in the past and present; LGBTQ history and activism; intersectionality; reproductive justice; transgender studies and trans liberation. The course emphasizes critical thinking and the cultivation of research skills necessary to investigate social and biological binaries.

Web 1
Instructor: E. Venell

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Gender and Zombies

This course will look at post-apocalyptic fiction, films, and games, most of which feature actual zombies or zombie-like figures, to ask what zombies mean at different historical moments, including our own.  Although there are several prototypical zombie novels in the nineteenth century, the zombie as we know it today is a creature of late capitalism, representing twentieth and twenty-first century popular anxieties about gender, labor, immigration, disease, class, sexuality, technology, race, national identity, and consumer culture.  Beginning with the origins of the zombie in Mary Shelley’s 1818 novelFrankenstein, following imperialist anxieties about whiteness, gender, and Haitian voodoo in 1930s films, we will trace the evolution of the apocalypticzombie during the Cold War and Civil Rights era of the 1950s and 1960s, and look at recent zombie apocalypse fiction and games to analyze how zombieliterature, films, and games criticize sexism, racism, imperialism, capitalism and consumer culture, ecological carelessness and destruction, and the exploitation of the poor. Texts will include FrankensteinThe Magic IslandI Am LegendThe Zombie Survival GuideDeadlands, and The Road. Films will include Night of the Living DeadDawn of the Dead, and the television series The Walking Dead, as well as White ZombieZombieland28 Days Later, and The Road. We will also look at how video games developed from Dawn of the Dead, and look briefly at some popular zombie games such as the 2002 game Resident Evil, the 2013 game The Last of Us, and The Walking Dead tie-in games. Students should expect to write 2 papers, complete a final project, and participate in regular discussion forum posts and some online meetings.

Web 1
Instructor: J. Hovey

 

Second Summer 2019

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Introduction to Gender Studies

Exploration of the growing body of research available from many disciplines (humanities, social sciences, sciences) for the study of women and men in the United States and abroad. Investigation of femininity and masculinity and the intersection of gender with other categories of identity.

Web 1
Instructor: J. Hovey

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Women, Bodies, and Horror

A study of gender within traditional and popular culture. This incarnation of Topics in Gender and Culture focuses on theories, representations, and metaphors of the body. Course texts include visual representations and written accounts of gender, race, disability, illness, pregnancy, and class, with an emphasis on gender in horror films from The Brood to Get Out.

Web 1
Instructor: E. Venell

 

August Intersession 2019

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Gender and Sexuality in cinema

This course examines representations of femininity, masculinity, and sexuality across different modes of film practice in the history of popular US cinema, with specific attention to how these representations intersect with race, ethnicity, nation and class. Using analytical approaches from gender and sexuality studies, film and media studies, and cultural studies we will investigate the ways in which popular US cinema critically engages in the historical, social, and cultural construction of gender and sexuality. This course teaches basic concepts of film analysis so that students can apply them to the films we watch, which will include: Alien (Ridley Scott, 1979); All that Heaven Allows (Douglas Sirk, 1959); American Beauty (Sam Mendes, 1999); Baby Face (Alfred E. Green, 1933); Far from Heaven (Todd Haynes, 2002); A Florida Enchantment (Sidney Drew, 1914); Get Out (Jordan Peele, 2017); Hollywood Shuffle (Robert Townsend, 1987); Lip (Tracey Moffatt, 1999); Mad Max: Fury Road (George Miller, 2015); Stepford Wives (Bryan Forbes, 1975); Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock, 1958).

Web 1
Instructor: L. Delassus

 

Fall 2019

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Introduction to Gender Studies

Exploration of the growing body of research available from many disciplines (humanities, social sciences, sciences) for the study of women and men in the United States and abroad. Investigation of femininity and masculinity and the intersection of gender with other categories of identity.

Section 1
Instructor: H. Coulson
TTH 1-2:15, Bondurant 114E

Section 2
Instructor:

Section 3
Instructor: S. Heying
TTH 8-9:15, Bondurant 116W

Web 1
Instructor: K. Chandler

Web 2
Instructor: E. Venell

Web 3
Instructor: E. Venell

Web 4
Instructor: E. Venell
Web 5
Instructor:

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Introduction to Queer Studies

This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of queer and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) studies with a particular focus on the queer south. This course examines the historical and social contexts of personal, cultural and political aspects of queer/LGBT life, and it explores LGBT liberation movements in relation to families, religion, laws, and society using intersectional lenses that consider gender, ethnicity, race, class, and ability. We consider the status, roles, and experiences, of lesbians, gay men, bisexual, and transgender people, using a variety of sources from fields such as anthropology, history, literature, sociology, southern studies, and women’s studies. Through the readings, discussions, and assignments, students develop critical analytical skills to consider social change movements with particular attention to how sex, gender, race, class, sexuality, sexual orientation, and other systems of power shape people’s everyday lives.

Web 1
Instructor: J. Enszer

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Topics in Gender and Culture

A study of gender roles within traditional and popular culture. The specific content of the course may vary in different semesters. Possible emphases might include women in the arts, women in film, women in the media, and women in popular culture.

Web 1
Instructor: E. Venell

Women, Bodies, and Horror

A study of gender within traditional and popular culture. This incarnation of Topics in Gender and Culture focuses on theories, representations, and metaphors of the body. Course texts include visual representations and written accounts of gender, race, disability, illness, pregnancy, and class, with an emphasis on gender in horror films from The Brood to Get Out.

Web 2
Instructor: J. Hovey

Gender and Zombies

This course will look at post-apocalyptic fiction, films, and games, most of which feature actual zombies or zombie-like figures, to ask what zombies mean at different historical moments, including our own.  Although there are several prototypical zombie novels in the nineteenth century, the zombie as we know it today is a creature of late capitalism, representing twentieth and twenty-first century popular anxieties about gender, labor, immigration, disease, class, sexuality, technology, race, national identity, and consumer culture.  Beginning with the origins of the zombie in Mary Shelley’s 1818 novelFrankenstein, following imperialist anxieties about whiteness, gender, and Haitian voodoo in 1930s films, we will trace the evolution of the apocalypticzombie during the Cold War and Civil Rights era of the 1950s and 1960s, and look at recent zombie apocalypse fiction and games to analyze how zombieliterature, films, and games criticize sexism, racism, imperialism, capitalism and consumer culture, ecological carelessness and destruction, and the exploitation of the poor. Texts will include FrankensteinThe Magic IslandI Am LegendThe Zombie Survival GuideDeadlands, and The Road. Films will include Night of the Living DeadDawn of the Dead, and the television series The Walking Dead, as well as White ZombieZombieland28 Days Later, and The Road. We will also look at how video games developed from Dawn of the Dead, and look briefly at some popular zombie games such as the 2002 game Resident Evil, the 2013 game The Last of Us, and The Walking Dead tie-in games. Students should expect to write 2 papers, complete a final project, and participate in regular discussion forum posts and some online meetings.

Web 3
Instructor: J. Hovey

Gender and the Law

This course will provide an introduction to the legal contexts where issues of gender and justice have been argued.  Through these readings we will explore how the law has decided issues of sexual difference, gender-based stereotypes, intersectional forms of discrimination, and the meaning of equality in domestic, labor, and political contexts. We will look at the history of how women have sought political rights such as suffrage, jury duty, and military service, how the legal system has regulated marriage, divorce, work, reproduction, family, and education, and how gender law has evolved to encompass men. We will also consider contemporary gender law in the era of Me, too! and the transgender and intersex rights movements.

Readings will include case law, especially Supreme Court cases, as well as feminist theory.   

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The Family

The American family as an institution and a group of interacting persons; the nature and problems of courtship, husband-wife, and parent-child relationships.

Crosslisted as SOC 301

Web 1
Instructor: J. Hill

Web 2
Instructor: J. Hill

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Theories in Gender

This interdisciplinary course analyzes theories in gender studies. The specific content of the course may vary. May be repeated once for credit with permission of director.

Sec 1
Instructor: T. Starkey
TTH 11-12:15, Location TBA

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Gender and Sexuality in cinema

This course examines representations of femininity, masculinity, and sexuality across different modes of film practice in the history of popular US cinema, with specific attention to how these representations intersect with race, ethnicity, nation and class. Using analytical approaches from gender and sexuality studies, film and media studies, and cultural studies we will investigate the ways in which popular US cinema critically engages in the historical, social, and cultural construction of gender and sexuality. This course teaches basic concepts of film analysis so that students can apply them to the films we watch, which will include: Alien (Ridley Scott, 1979); All that Heaven Allows (Douglas Sirk, 1959); American Beauty (Sam Mendes, 1999); Baby Face (Alfred E. Green, 1933); Far from Heaven (Todd Haynes, 2002); A Florida Enchantment (Sidney Drew, 1914); Get Out (Jordan Peele, 2017); Hollywood Shuffle (Robert Townsend, 1987); Lip (Tracey Moffatt, 1999); Mad Max: Fury Road (George Miller, 2015); Stepford Wives (Bryan Forbes, 1975); Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock, 1958).

Web 1
Instructor: L. Delassus

Web 2
Instructor: L. Delassus

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Gender and Sexuality in the Media

This course teaches students to examine and analyze how representations of gender and sexuality have or have not changed over time. This exploration will include theoretical readings and analysis of television, film, music & music videos, broadcast and print journalism, magazines, advertising, social media, comic books, graphic novels, anime, user-generated online content, and online gaming.

Web 1
Instructor: K. Cozart
T 4-4:50, Lamar 515

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Women in the South

A study of the experience of women in the South as revealed primarily through their writings and other expressions.

Crosslisted as ENG 357

Section 1
Instructor: J. Hall
TTH 9:30-10:45, Bishop 104

Section 2
Instructor: J. Hall
TTH 11:00-12:15, Carrier 119

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Women in Literature

This course will focus on poetry, memoir, and fiction by 20th and 21st century women writers from the U.S., Europe, and the Caribbean. The course is divided into four modules, Silence & Voice, Writing Bodies/Bodies Writing, Identity & Difference, and Resistance & Transformation, which will help us conceptualize key questions about women’s writing. Under what historical circumstances and constraints have women written? How have they managed to break silence and find their voices? What strategies have they used to convey their ideas? What perspectives on women’s bodies do women offer when writing about sexual desire, motherhood, or sexual assault? How have women writers resisted and how do they continue to resist the political, literary, or social status quo? By the end of the course, students should be able to address each of these questions. Among the authors we will read are bell hooks, Audre Lorde, Angela Carter, Helene Cixous, Claudia Rankine, and Adrienne Rich. Assignments include weekly blog posts, exams, and a research paper.

Crosslisted as ENG 385

Web 1
Instructor: M. Hipp

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Special Topics in Gender Studies

Content varies. May be repeated once for credit with permission of the director.

Section 1
Instructor: A. Steele
TTH 11:00-12:15, Farley 138

Oral History Podcasts

If you're interested in learning how to collect and produce great audio project, this class is for you. Audio skills help with multimedia projects and radio production. The skills learned in this class with help with social justice projects as well. The power of audio.

This class is offered to students interested in producing oral history podcasts as it relates to gender studies and women’s rights in Mississippi during the early 20th century. The primary objective is to produce engaging and storytelling audio projects that are of professional quality. Students will also learn basic mobile photography skills to produce formal portraits of their interviewees. Students will learn how interviewing, scriptwriting, and producing skills. Work produced in this class will directly benefit journalism and gender studies majors and minors, who are interested in multimedia, and community engagement through cultural and historic preservation. Each student will be required to pitch and produce at least four individual stories that include news and feature stories, with reports of varying time lengths. The goal is create thoughtful, newsworthy and engaging audio projects and an accompanying photo exhibition for university-sponsored events.

Crosslisted as JOUR 362

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Race, Place, and Space

Maps are instructive. Some tell us where to go. Others tell us where we’ve been. They can reveal closed and detoured routes. They can show if we are ahead of schedule and alert us when we are behind. This class is about maps—in particular, the racial maps of the contemporary United States of America. Here, we are using “map” both as a metaphor for how racial inequality manifests in geographically-distinct ways and as a framework for understanding how racism structures American culture, politics, social institutions, and everyday life. We will focus special attention on black maps, surveying classical and contemporary scholarship to debunk dominant fictions and reveal uncomfortable truths about the experiences and everyday realities of black folks. As with most trips, this course begins with good music. The first section draws on the mixtape metaphor to explore foundational concepts and theories in the study of racism and racial inequality. Then, we “map” the nation’s contemporary racial landscape, beginning in the Lawndale community in Chicago and ending in the Beautiful, Dark, Twisted imagination of Kanye West. Along the way, we’ll talk Kendrick, J. Cole, Big Freedia, and A Seat at the Table. We’ll read Bonilla-Silva and Zandria Robinson. We’ll debate reparations and explore the school-to-prison pipeline. We’ll hear from James Baldwin. Importantly, we’ll also hear from each other, treating our own selfhood as a type of racial map, with lessons, questions, and new routes to bear.

Crosslisted as AAS 414, SST 314, SOC 414

Section 1
Instructor: B. Foster
TTH 1 - 2:15, Lamar 555

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African American Women's History

In this course, we will emphasize African American women’s activism within the Black Radical Tradition from African origins to the present. The course will acquaint you with many of the critical questions and concepts Africana women activists and scholars have developed as tools for thinking about the social construction of gender and race and how these categories of identity intersect with other relations of power. Consequently, we will explore the very different kinds of ideologies, strategies, practices, and discourses African American women have developed and mobilized over time and across lines of class, region, and sexual orientation. Our goal is to not only underscore the heterogeneity of African American women’s political imaginings and doings but also underscore a coherent but diverse, intersectional organizing tradition.

We will critically explore these and other questions: Is there a broad but distinct African American women’s organizing tradition, and what are its defining features or hallmarks? How have identities of gender, race, class, nationality, sexuality, religion, and age structured and shaped African American women’s activism? How do African American women reinforce and disrupt standard narratives about the Black Liberation Movement as well as the Women’s Rights movement? How have African American women carved out spaces within and in opposition to U.S. capitalism? How have other groups sought to represent and control African American women’s lives and bodies, and how have women themselves worked to represent themselves?

Crosslisted as AAS 362, HST 418

Sec 1
Instructor: S. Garrett-Scott
TTH 9:30 - 10:45, Location TBA

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Readings in U.S. Black Feminism

Students will study the development, expression, ideology, and praxis of the politics African American women have developed to simultaneously counter both racism and sexism.

Crosslisted as AAS 421

Web 1
Instructor: K. Chandler

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U.S. Gender History

An analysis of changing views of the masculine and the feminine in American culture since 1607. Class, racial, and ethnic differences will be emphasized.

Crosslisted as HST 429

Section 1
Instructor: E. Payne
TTH 2:30 - 3:45, Bishop 101

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Language, Gender, and Sexuality

Students will study the relationship among language, gender, and sexuality from local and global perspectives.

Crosslisted as LIN 538, TESL 538

Section 1
Instructor: T. Warhol
W 5:30 - 7:45, Bondurant 107E

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Psychology of Human Sexuality

A survey of behavioral, psychological, and physiological research on human sexuality.

Crosslisted as PSY 460

Section 1
Instructor: C. Smith
TH 1:00 - 2:15, Bryant 209

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Internship in Gender Studies

Internship in approved work settings under professional supervision. May be repeated once for a cumulative total of 3 hours of credit. Z grade.

Coordinator: K. Cozart

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Special Topics in Gender Studies

Content varies. May be repeated once for credit with permission of director.

Sec 1
Instructor: R. Justice-Malloy
MWF 1-1:50, Bishop 324

Dramaturgy

Create a working relationship with an emerging professional woman playwright on a new work that will be presented in Oxford, Summer/Fall 2020. Learn innovative ways (non-Aristotelian) of evaluating new artistic works. Giving dramaturgical support to emerging women (transgender inclusive) playwrights. Participate in a Student Pedagogical Team where YOU create the syllabus and choose the themes and topics you want to explore. Serve as a cultural ambassador for new works and arts programming. Participate in community outreach and arts programming. Analyze and evaluate a variety of new, unpublished dramatic works. Learn dramaturgical methodologies for serving devised and improvised work. If you would like more information please contact Dr. Malloy at rjmalloy@olemiss.edu.

Crosslisted as THEA 498

Sec 2
Instructor: J. Harker
MW 4-5:15, Carrier 119

Christopher Isherwood and the Idea of a Gay Literary Canon

This course uses Christopher Isherwood’s network and writing career to explore the idea of a 20th century gay literary canon, including competing theories about gay authorship, gay readership, and gay writing practices. Possible texts include Isherwood’s novels The Berlin Stories, A Single Man, and Christopher and His Kind; E.M. Forster’s Maurice, Tennessee Williams’ One Arm, Truman Capote’s Breakfast at Tiffany’s, Armistead Maupin’s Significant Others, selections from the periodical Christopher Street, and relevant articles from the 1970s about a gay canon. Because this course counts as a capstone, it requires short papers, an annotated bibliography, and 15-17 page research paper.

Crosslisted as ENG 472

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Psychology of Gender

Investigation of the psychological and physiological determinants of gender differences and similarities in behavior, covering topics such as cognitive functioning, social relationships, mental health, and the work place.

Crosslisted as PSY 565

Section 1
Instructor: C. Smith
MW 11-12:15, Peabody 202

 

Graduate Courses

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Gender Theory

In this class, we will examine a variety of theoretical perspectives and themes used by researchers of gender from the last century (e.g., Intersectionality, Queer Theory, Critical Race Theory).

Because there is not one theory but many, I will not be teaching you which is right or which is wrong; there is no such thing. In this class, you will need to think critically about the theories and understand how they are similar to and different from one another.  It will be up to you to evaluate the theories – Does the theory make logical sense? Is it consistent with material learned in other classes? Do research and personal experience support it? What kind of impact has it had on the field and beyond? You are expected to develop your own opinions about each of these theories, which you will then be able to explain, defend, and explore further.  

Instructor: T. Starkey
T 3 - 5:30, S. Residential College 123

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Readings in Global History: Gender

This course examines mid-century feminist movements from a transnational perspective. Many histories of second-wave feminism focus on the women’s movement as a western, American, and primarily white movement. This course looks to complicate both our understanding of second-wave feminism in an American context—as a movement that was simultaneously intersectional and global—and examine feminist movements through case studies around the world. Through the course, we will question what kinds of activist work count as “feminist” and consider new paradigms for understanding feminist work outside of American contexts.

Course Objectives:

  • To provide multiple histories of feminist movements around the world

  • To enable students to develop new methodologies as they read and develop feminist histories

  • To enable students to recognize cultural assumptions and misconceptions in our understanding of feminist history

Crosslisted as HST 641

Instructor: J. Wilkerson
TTH 1 - 2:15, TBA

Others to be announced.