Current Course Offerings

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Wintersession 20

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Gender and Culture

Description coming soon!

Web 1
Instructor: K. Chandler

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Gender and Sexuality in cinema

This course examines representations of femininity, masculinity, and sexuality across different modes of film practice in the history of popular US cinema, with specific attention to how these representations intersect with race, ethnicity, nation and class. Using analytical approaches from gender and sexuality studies, film and media studies, and cultural studies we will investigate the ways in which popular US cinema critically engages in the historical, social, and cultural construction of gender and sexuality. This course teaches basic concepts of film analysis so that students can apply them to the films we watch, which will include: Alien (Ridley Scott, 1979); All that Heaven Allows (Douglas Sirk, 1959); American Beauty (Sam Mendes, 1999); Baby Face (Alfred E. Green, 1933); Far from Heaven (Todd Haynes, 2002); A Florida Enchantment (Sidney Drew, 1914); Get Out (Jordan Peele, 2017); Hollywood Shuffle (Robert Townsend, 1987); Lip (Tracey Moffatt, 1999); Mad Max: Fury Road (George Miller, 2015); Stepford Wives (Bryan Forbes, 1975); Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock, 1958).

Web 1
Instructor: T. Starkey

 

Spring 2020

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Introduction to Gender Studies

Exploration of the growing body of research available from many disciplines (humanities, social sciences, sciences) for the study of women and men in the United States and abroad. Investigation of femininity and masculinity and the intersection of gender with other categories of identity.

Section 1
Instructor: T. Starkey
TTH 1-2:15, S. Res College Room 113

Section 2
Instructor: H. Coulson
TTH 8:00-9:15AM, Bondurant Room 116W

Section 3 Honors
Instructor: T. Starkey
TTH 11:00-12:15, Honors College Room 016
Limited to students in the Sally McDonnell Barksdale Honors College

Web 1
Instructor: E. Venell

Web 2
Instructor: E. Venell

Web 3
Instructor: E. Venell

Web 4
Instructor: K. Chandler
Web 5
Instructor: K. Chandler

Web 6
Instructor: J. Hovey

Web 7
Instructor: J. Hovey

Independent Study
Instructor: K. Cozart

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Introduction to Queer Studies

This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of queer and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) studies with a particular focus on the queer south. This course examines the historical and social contexts of personal, cultural and political aspects of queer/LGBT life, and it explores LGBT liberation movements in relation to families, religion, laws, and society using intersectional lenses that consider gender, ethnicity, race, class, and ability. We consider the status, roles, and experiences, of lesbians, gay men, bisexual, and transgender people, using a variety of sources from fields such as anthropology, history, literature, sociology, southern studies, and women’s studies. Through the readings, discussions, and assignments, students develop critical analytical skills to consider social change movements with particular attention to how sex, gender, race, class, sexuality, sexual orientation, and other systems of power shape people’s everyday lives.

Web 1
Instructor: J. Enszer

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Topics in Gender and Culture

A study of gender roles within traditional and popular culture. The specific content of the course may vary in different semesters. Possible emphases might include women in the arts, women in film, women in the media, and women in popular culture.

Web 1
Instructor: E. Venell

Queer Cinema

This section of GST 301 explores the themes and representations of LGBTQ+ sexuality on screen. Students will analyze the patterns, tropes, innovators, and protests that have shaped the field of “queer cinema,” and continue to influence mainstream depictions. Screenings will include works by famous Hollywood directors, infamous independent filmmakers, and vanguard video artists.

Web 2
Instructor: A. Winburn

Issues of Inequity in Eduction

Strategies for interacting and working with diverse individuals as identified by gender, ethinicity, race, class, sexual orientation, age, disability, or religion. This course addresses methods for positively impacting diversity and equity issues including the possible effects of culture, racial stereotyping, socioeconomic status, gender, language, and values on human development and progress in a K-12 setting. Course content emphasizes both individual and small group work.

Web 3
Instructor: J. Hovey

Gender and Zombies

This course will look at post-apocalyptic fiction, films, and games, most of which feature actual zombies or zombie-like figures, to ask what zombies mean at different historical moments, including our own.  Although there are several prototypical zombie novels in the nineteenth century, the zombie as we know it today is a creature of late capitalism, representing twentieth and twenty-first century popular anxieties about gender, labor, immigration, disease, class, sexuality, technology, race, national identity, and consumer culture.  Beginning with the origins of the zombie in Mary Shelley’s 1818 novelFrankenstein, following imperialist anxieties about whiteness, gender, and Haitian voodoo in 1930s films, we will trace the evolution of the apocalypticzombie during the Cold War and Civil Rights era of the 1950s and 1960s, and look at recent zombie apocalypse fiction and games to analyze how zombieliterature, films, and games criticize sexism, racism, imperialism, capitalism and consumer culture, ecological carelessness and destruction, and the exploitation of the poor. Texts will include FrankensteinThe Magic IslandI Am LegendThe Zombie Survival GuideDeadlands, and The Road. Films will include Night of the Living DeadDawn of the Dead, and the television series The Walking Dead, as well as White ZombieZombieland28 Days Later, and The Road. We will also look at how video games developed from Dawn of the Dead, and look briefly at some popular zombie games such as the 2002 game Resident Evil, the 2013 game The Last of Us, and The Walking Dead tie-in games. Students should expect to write 2 papers, complete a final project, and participate in regular discussion forum posts and some online meetings.

Web 4
Instructor: K. Cozart

Queering Television

Description coming soon!    

Independent Study
Instructor: K. Cozart

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The Family

The American family as an institution and a group of interacting persons; the nature and problems of courtship, husband-wife, and parent-child relationships.

Crosslisted as SOC 301

Section 1
Instructor: E. Lake
TTH 1:00-2:15, Lamar Room 131

Regional Campus Offerings:

Desoto - Section 1
Instructor: M. Katterjohn
TTH 4:30-5:45

Tupelo - Section 1
Instructor: D. Lindley
T 6:00-8:30pm

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Queer Playwriting and American Culture

An exploration of LGBTQ-related plays and their influence on American culture.  The course examines how LGBTQ-related plays contributed to shaping American cultural trends and values and traces the evolution of popular opinion.  A significant portion of the course of study is devoted to the perspectives of LGBTQ characters, individuals, and playwrights.

Crosslisted as THEA 329

Section 1
Instructor: J. Cantu
MW, 2:30 – 3:45, Hume 215

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The South and Sexuality

Students will study the ways in which the South has been constructed through depictions of sexuality, especially forms of sexuality deemed marginal, perverse, and dangerous.

Crosslisted as SST 350

Section 1
Instructor: S. Heying
TTH, 2:30 – 3:45, Hume 106

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Women in Politics

The purpose of this course is to examine the agency of women in shaping world politics, and the influence of international relations on the lives of women around the world. In the first half we will focus on women’s representation and elected leadership. We will look in-depth at the reasons why women have historically been excluded from politics, as well as the structural challenges and institutional changes that have been made to increase women’s representation. We will then move beyond elected office to consider women’s participation in politics through social movements. We will examine how international norms regarding gender equality have been enshrined in the operations of international organizations and what effects these norms have had on women’s rights and political participation in various contexts.

Crosslisted as POL 346

Section 1
Instructor: G. Love
TTH, 11 - 12:15, Bishop 107

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Gender and Sexuality in cinema

This course examines representations of femininity, masculinity, and sexuality across different modes of film practice in the history of popular US cinema, with specific attention to how these representations intersect with race, ethnicity, nation and class. Using analytical approaches from gender and sexuality studies, film and media studies, and cultural studies we will investigate the ways in which popular US cinema critically engages in the historical, social, and cultural construction of gender and sexuality. This course teaches basic concepts of film analysis so that students can apply them to the films we watch, which will include: Alien (Ridley Scott, 1979); All that Heaven Allows (Douglas Sirk, 1959); American Beauty (Sam Mendes, 1999); Baby Face (Alfred E. Green, 1933); Far from Heaven (Todd Haynes, 2002); A Florida Enchantment (Sidney Drew, 1914); Get Out (Jordan Peele, 2017); Hollywood Shuffle (Robert Townsend, 1987); Lip (Tracey Moffatt, 1999); Mad Max: Fury Road (George Miller, 2015); Stepford Wives (Bryan Forbes, 1975); Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock, 1958).

Web 1
Instructor: L. Delassus

Web 2
Instructor: L. Delassus

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Women in the South

A study of the experience of women in the South as revealed primarily through their writings and other expressions.

Crosslisted as ENG 357

Section 1
Instructor: J. Hall
TTH 9:30-10:45, Bishop 104

Section 2
Instructor: J. Hall
TTH 11:00-12:15, Carrier 119

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Women in Literature

This course will focus on poetry, memoir, and fiction by 20th and 21st century women writers from the U.S., Europe, and the Caribbean. The course is divided into four modules, Silence & Voice, Writing Bodies/Bodies Writing, Identity & Difference, and Resistance & Transformation, which will help us conceptualize key questions about women’s writing. Under what historical circumstances and constraints have women written? How have they managed to break silence and find their voices? What strategies have they used to convey their ideas? What perspectives on women’s bodies do women offer when writing about sexual desire, motherhood, or sexual assault? How have women writers resisted and how do they continue to resist the political, literary, or social status quo? By the end of the course, students should be able to address each of these questions. Among the authors we will read are bell hooks, Audre Lorde, Angela Carter, Helene Cixous, Claudia Rankine, and Adrienne Rich. Assignments include weekly blog posts, exams, and a research paper.

Crosslisted as ENG 385

Web 1
Instructor: M. Hipp

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Women, Gender, and the Environment

This class examines environmental issues through the lens of gender and its intersections with race, class, ethnicity, sexuality, and nationality.

Independent Study
Instructor: K. Cozart

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Race, Place, and Space

Maps are instructive. Some tell us where to go. Others tell us where we’ve been. They can reveal closed and detoured routes. They can show if we are ahead of schedule and alert us when we are behind. This class is about maps—in particular, the racial maps of the contemporary United States of America. Here, we are using “map” both as a metaphor for how racial inequality manifests in geographically-distinct ways and as a framework for understanding how racism structures American culture, politics, social institutions, and everyday life. We will focus special attention on black maps, surveying classical and contemporary scholarship to debunk dominant fictions and reveal uncomfortable truths about the experiences and everyday realities of black folks. As with most trips, this course begins with good music. The first section draws on the mixtape metaphor to explore foundational concepts and theories in the study of racism and racial inequality. Then, we “map” the nation’s contemporary racial landscape, beginning in the Lawndale community in Chicago and ending in the Beautiful, Dark, Twisted imagination of Kanye West. Along the way, we’ll talk Kendrick, J. Cole, Big Freedia, and A Seat at the Table. We’ll read Bonilla-Silva and Zandria Robinson. We’ll debate reparations and explore the school-to-prison pipeline. We’ll hear from James Baldwin. Importantly, we’ll also hear from each other, treating our own selfhood as a type of racial map, with lessons, questions, and new routes to bear.

Crosslisted as AAS 414, SST 314, SOC 414

Section 1
Instructor: B. Foster
TTH 14- 5:15, Lamar 519

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Women in United States History

History of the struggle for equality in U.S. politics and culture.

Crosslisted as HST 428

Section 1
Instructor: J. Wilkerson
MWF 11- 11:50, S. Residential College 113

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Internship in Gender Studies

Internship in approved work settings under professional supervision. May be repeated once for a cumulative total of 3 hours of credit. Z grade.

Coordinator: K. Cozart

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Special Topics in Gender Studies

Content varies. May be repeated once for credit with permission of director.

Section 1
Instructor: C. Smith
TTH 9:30-10:45, Peabody Room 202

Personal Relationships

This course is a capstone course in which we will immerse ourselves in the field of relationship science. Over the course of the semester, you will develop an understanding of the theories and methodologies of relationship science, as well as evaluating some of the historical and recent trends of findings in the field..

Crosslisted as PSY 456

Section 2
Instructor: P. Wood
MW 8:30-9:50AM, ROTC Room 1

Queer Loves: Representations of Polyamory in Theatre, Film, & Popular Culture

Using a queer studies framework, this class looks at how polyamory has been represented in the 20th and 21st centuries in theatre, film, and other popular culture forms. While queer sexualities will be part of what the class examines, we will focus more on networks, definitions, and presentations of non-monogamous love.

Crosslisted as THEA 498

 

Graduate Courses

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Gender Studies Methodology

This course will introduce students to the interdisciplinary field of gender studies, including the use of both quantitative and qualitative methods in order to understand gender in a transnational perspective.

Section 1
Instructor: H. Coulson
T 3-5:30, South Residential College 123

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Feminist Pedagogy

In this seminar, we will further our knowledge of feminist pedagogies through rigorous reading, writing responses, guest speakers, co-teaching experiences, and class discussion. We will explore feminist and interrelated critical pedagogies and their application in different kinds of classrooms, with a focus on the gender studies classroom.

Section 1
Instructor: D.Unger
W 4-6:30, Lamar 310

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Gender Theory

In this class, we will examine a variety of theoretical perspectives and themes used by researchers of gender from the last century (e.g., Intersectionality, Queer Theory, Critical Race Theory).

Because there is not one theory but many, I will not be teaching you which is right or which is wrong; there is no such thing. In this class, you will need to think critically about the theories and understand how they are similar to and different from one another.  It will be up to you to evaluate the theories – Does the theory make logical sense? Is it consistent with material learned in other classes? Do research and personal experience support it? What kind of impact has it had on the field and beyond? You are expected to develop your own opinions about each of these theories, which you will then be able to explain, defend, and explore further.  

Instructor: T. Starkey
T 3 - 5:30, S. Residential College 123

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Readings in Global History: Gender

This course examines mid-century feminist movements from a transnational perspective. Many histories of second-wave feminism focus on the women’s movement as a western, American, and primarily white movement. This course looks to complicate both our understanding of second-wave feminism in an American context—as a movement that was simultaneously intersectional and global—and examine feminist movements through case studies around the world. Through the course, we will question what kinds of activist work count as “feminist” and consider new paradigms for understanding feminist work outside of American contexts.

Course Objectives:

  • To provide multiple histories of feminist movements around the world

  • To enable students to develop new methodologies as they read and develop feminist histories

  • To enable students to recognize cultural assumptions and misconceptions in our understanding of feminist history

Crosslisted as HST 641

Instructor: J. Wilkerson
TTH 1 - 2:15, TBA

Others to be announced.